Introduction to Adventures in Parenting

Parenting

Have you heard the latest advice about parenting?

Of course you have. From experts to other parents, people are always ready to give you parenting advice. Parenting tips, parents’ survival guides, dos, don’ts, shoulds, and shouldn’ts—new ones come out every day.

But with so much information available, how can anyone figure out what really works? How do you know whose advice to follow? Isn’t parenting just common sense anyway? How can the experts know what it’s like to be a parent in a real house?

What’s a parent to do?

Try RPM3—a no-frills approach to parenting from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

For over 30 years, the NICHD has conducted and supported research in parenting and child development. We’ve talked to experts, parents, and children. We’ve collected statistics, identified myths, a...More

Fast Facts: Learn! Fast!

What is the RPM3 approach to parenting?

  • The first thing you need to know is that there are no perfect parents.
  • Parenting isn't all-or-nothing.
  • Successes and mistakes are part of being a parent.
  • Start to think about the type of parent you want to be.
  • RPM3 stands for:
    • Responding to your child in an appropriate manner.
    • Preventing risky behavior or problems before they arise.
    • Monitoring your child's contact with his or her surrounding world.
    • Mentoring your child to support and encourage desired behaviors.
    • Modeling your own behavior to provide a consistent, positive example for your child.
  • By including responding, preventing, monitoring, mentoring, and modeling in your day-to-day parenting activities, you can become a more effective, consistent, active, and attentive parent.
  • Learn how to apply the RPM3 approach if your child is:

For more information


News Articles

  • 6 Expert Tips for Defusing Kids' Quarantine Meltdowns

    When kids and teens chafe under COVID-19 quarantine, how can parents stop the meltdowns and misbehavior? More...

  • For Many Kids, Picky Eating Isn't Just a Phase, Study Finds

    Researchers found that choosy 4-year-olds were still turning their noses up at many foods at age 9 -- suggesting their finicky eating is more of a trait than a phase. More...

  • Sure-Fire Solutions for Managing Lockdown Temper Tantrums

    Experts suggest parents start with understanding. Children and teens miss the lack of personal connection they're used to, and online-only encounters are losing their allure. More...

  • Pandemic Has Overburdened Parents Stressed Out: Poll

    If there's such a thing as a "new normal" during the coronavirus pandemic, it's a constant state of stress. More...

  • Keeping Kids Slim, Fit During Lockdown Isn't Easy: Here Are Some Tips

    Lots of TV time, no PE classes, and a fridge full of food: It's a recipe for weight gain for kids under "stay at home" rules. More...

  • 45 More
    • Pets May Help Parents of Kids With Autism Fight Stress

      Pets are stress-relievers for parents of children with autism and benefit their kids, too, a new study suggests. More...

    • Best Ways to Help Kids Through the Pandemic

      They're not at school. They miss their friends. And Mom and Dad look worried. Lockdown during the coronavirus pandemic can take a toll on everyone, especially kids. More...

    • Calm Parenting Will Help Children Through Coronavirus Pandemic

      The disruptions in daily life caused by the coronavirus pandemic could cause problems for children, but there are things parents can do to help their kids deal with the changes, experts say. More...

    • Kids of Mentally Ill Parents Have Higher Injury Odds

      Children of parents with mental illness are at increased risk for injuries, researchers report. More...

    • School Closures Could Be Adding to Kids' Waistlines

      One side effect of the coronavirus pandemic could be long-lasting: U.S. school closures may worsen the child obesity crisis, experts warn. More...

    • Why Your Kids' Playground Is Unsafe During COVID-19 Pandemic

      It's a tough task, but parents need to keep kids away from playgrounds, shared toys and sports equipment during the coronavirus pandemic, experts emphasize. More...

    • Why Teens Find It Tough to Social Distance

      Parenting a teenager can be an emotional minefield in the best of times, but the social distancing of the coronavirus pandemic could really strain young people's mental health. More...

    • Going Easy on Yourself Is Key to Parenting Through the Pandemic

      Many parents are struggling to work from home and meet the needs of kids who are out of school and chaffing under what some consider house arrest. More...

    • A Parent's Guide to Fighting Coronavirus Stress

      Stressed-out parents should reach out to others for support during the coronavirus pandemic, child health experts say. More...

    • How to Keep Housebound Kids Busy During a Pandemic

      If you and the kids are staying home to avoid the coronavirus, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers this advice to help you make the best of the situation. More...

    • Calming Your Child's Coronavirus Fears

      Schools are closing. Sports and other activities have been cancelled. Everything is changing. In the midst of this chaos, how do parents keep kids from stressing too much? More...

    • Pick Summer Camps Carefully When Your Kid Has Allergies, Asthma

      If you child has allergies or asthma, you need to take that into consideration when selecting a summer camp. More...

    • Keep Your Kids Safe, Warm in Wintertime Fun

      Sledding, skiing and ice skating are big fun in the winter, but can lead to big injuries, too. More...

    • Got 'Couch Potato' Teens? It's Not Helping Their Mental Health

      Getting your surly teens off the couch might trigger a long-term turnaround in their moods, new research suggests. More...

    • 8 Ways to Make Every Day a Valentine For Your Kids

      As Valentine's Day approaches, parents are reminded to shower their children with love and attention throughout the year. More...

    • What Parents Can Do to Prevent Teens From Driving Drunk

      Older teens who know that their parents disapprove of drinking are less likely to drive impaired as young adults, a new study finds. More...

    • Why Are Fewer U.S. Kids Going to Pediatricians?

      Overall visits to the pediatrician in the United States dropped by 14% between 2008 and 2016. Sick visits were down 24%. More...

    • Parents Can Help Their Sleep-Deprived Teens

      American teens aren't getting enough sleep, which can lead to anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts. Sleepy teens also are more likely to get into car crashes and have a greater risk of being injured while playing sports. More...

    • Health Tip: What Your Child Can do About Bullying

      Regardless of the medium, bullying can make young people afraid, stressed, depressed and anxious. More...

    • Health Tip: Safety Steps if Your Child is Home Alone

      If your child is going to be home alone, it's a good idea to have the child check in periodically, says the American Red Cross. The Red Cross mentions other steps parents should take: More...

    • Health Tip: Is My Child Too Sick to Go to School?

      Figuring out whether your child is well enough to go to school can be difficult, says KidsHealth. More...

    • Slow Down and Enjoy a Safe Christmas

      Keep the holidays happy, healthy and safe by following a few guidelines, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says. More...

    • Health Tip: Choosing a Pediatrician

      Pediatricians are specially trained to treat children from birth through adolescence and into the patient's young adult years, says the American Academy of Family Physicians. More...

    • 'Don't Give Up:' Parents' Intuition Spots a Rare Illness Before Doctors Do

      Parents usually know their child better than anyone, and if a parent suspects something is wrong, it probably is. More...

    • Nature Nurtures Kids

      Taking that trek through the woods with your child may do more than build strong muscles. More...

    • When Your Teen Wants a Tattoo

      The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports that 29% of the population has at least one tattoo. So this is a question you're likely to face as a parent. You may not be in favor of it, but it's important to know what steps to take, especially if your child is insistent. More...

    • Tough Childhoods Can Leave a Lifetime of Harm, Experts Say

      Traumatic experiences in childhood can do lifelong harm to physical and mental health, education and work, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says. More...

    • Many U.S. Parents Can't Find a Psychiatrist to Help Their Child

      The study found that almost three-quarters of American counties don't have a single child psychiatrist. More...

    • Check Those Halloween Treats So They're Safe to Eat

      Almost 41 million American children will don costumes and go trick-or-treating tonight, so all parents should remember that not every treat is safe for their kid. More...

    • How Young Is Too Young to Leave Kids Home Alone?

      Children should be at least 12 years old before they're left home alone for four hours or more, a majority of U.S. social workers surveyed say. More...

    • How to Keep Halloween Fun and Safe

      There's no trick to keeping kids safe this Halloween -- it just takes some planning, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. More...

    • Trying to Conceive? Both Dad and Mom Should Give Up Drinking in Months Before

      If would-be moms and dads drink in the three months before pregnancy, and if mom drinks during the first trimester, they run the risk of having a baby with congenital heart disease. Men's drinking boosts the risk 44%, and women's, 16%. More...

    • Paper Books Beat Tablets for Parent-Child Interactions, Study Finds

      Parents seeking quality reading time with their toddlers would do well to choose an old-fashioned book over a newfangled e-reader, a new study argues. More...

    • A Good Night's Sleep Is Key to School Success

      Now that children are back in school, it's important to make sure they get enough shut-eye, sleep experts say. More...

    • Don't Let Kids Wander Alone in Parking Lots

      Many children walk through parking lots without adult supervision, putting them in great danger, a new study warns. More...

    • Most U.S. Parents Say Vaccination Should Be Requirement for School: Poll

      More than 8 in 10 U.S. adults say kids should be required to get vaccinated in order to attend school, but far fewer trust the safety of vaccines, a new poll finds. More...

    • Nurturing Childhood Boosts Odds of a Happy Adult Life: Study

      Kids who grow up confident that their parents, friends and community have their back are far less likely to struggle with depression or other serious mental health issues as adults, new research indicates. More...

    • Is a Charter School the Right Choice for Your Child?

      Charter schools have been around for more than 25 years, yet many people know little about them or whether they're a smart option for their children. Created as a way to increase student achievement, the concept has its share of both critics and supporters. More...

    • Backpacks Shouldn't Be a Back-to-School Burden on Health

      Books, tablets, lunch: Stuff can really start to weigh heavily in your kid's school backpack. More...

    • 5 Health Tips to Promote Back-to-School Success

      Healthy kids do better in school -- something parents need to think about as they prepare for a new academic year. More...

    • Older Parents May Have Better Behaved Kids

      The study found that kids with at least one older parent were less likely to be defiant rule-breakers or physically aggressive. More...

    • What Happens to the Children When Parents Fight?

      But as it turns out, it's not always the fighting, but rather the way you fight that can have a negative -- or a positive -- effect on your children. More...

    • Parents Who Belittle Their Children May Be Raising Bullies

      It's a vicious cycle: Teens who are belittled and demeaned by their parents are more likely to be bullied and to bully others, a new study suggests. More...

    • 'Failure to Launch': Poll Finds Many Older Teens Still Too Reliant on Parents

      Most parents think they are doing enough to prepare their teens for adulthood, but they're wincing a bit as the time comes for their young to leave the nest, the survey reports. More...

    • How to Help When Your Child Weighs Too Much

      Seventeen percent of American children and teens are obese and a nearly equal number are overweight, and those who are taunted about their weight tend to gain even more in response, according to a study from the U.S. National Institutes of Health. More...

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